Fireworks!

Around the world, fireworks traditionally mark special holidays and events, and people in the US will see their fair share this weekend as the nation celebrates the 4th of July.

The New York Times must also be in a celebratory mood as it has launched its fireworks a day early. Have a look at today’s editorial. It breathlessly states:

“The aim of the Dodd-Frank law is to prevent gambling in derivatives, financial contracts that are supposed to manage risk, but that have long been misused for catastrophically excessive speculation.”

Ka-boom!

We have heard many explanations about what Dodd-Frank is supposed to be about, but none as breathless as this one. Have a look at this document from the Senate Banking Committee: Nothing about preventing gambling.

With regard to “long been misused for catastrophically excessive speculation,” we would ask a simple question: what does this mean? If it refers to derivatives-related losses that brought a firm down, which ones does the editorial have in mind? Barings? Orange County? MF Global? They were all about exchange-traded products or securities. Lehman? Countrywide? Washington Mutual? Fannie and Freddie? These were real-estate related, in the form of either mortgages or mortgage securities. None of these situations stemmed from OTC derivatives.

And then there’s AIG, which certainly did involve OTC derivatives. But whatever AIG was, it wasn’t speculation that led to its bailout. Inadequate risk management and margining practices were at the core of the problem.

Now we know the editorial represents the conventional wisdom in many circles. We are clearly swimming upstream. The actual facts are, in some sense, nothing more than an annoyance to this story line. Positing them creates a risk of being tarred and feathered as anti-regulation or anti-Dodd-Frank. But this too would be inaccurate.

One more important item we should point out: the statement quoted above is not the main point of the paper’s editorial, which is about derivatives trading outside the US by certain foreign affiliates of US banks. But the thinking behind it shapes and informs the views expressed on the main issue, which is why it invites (nay, demands) comment. And we are happy to oblige.


As for the main issue: it is clear today that a growing number of non-US companies and firms are looking to ensure that they operate within the regulatory frameworks of their home jurisdictions (e.g., firms trading in the European Union regulated by EU rules and rule-makers).

They do not want to trigger US regulatory requirements because it would add another layer to their compliance efforts without any countervailing benefit. Their view is that this additional layer is unnecessary because the regulatory frameworks in each major jurisdiction are basically equivalent (albeit there are differences in timing). It’s a view shared by US firms who operate under US rules and who do not want to face duplicative rules elsewhere.

Policymakers around the world are currently trying to hash out how to make a global system of equivalency work for a product set — OTC derivatives — that is truly global.

None of this is mentioned in the editorial.

Happy 4th of July!

Mondays always get me down

A decent weekend. Not much going on…

And then, on Monday morning, bam! Breaking news from The Wall Street Journal: “Big U.S. Banks Make Swaps A Foreign Affair”. The story basically posits that US banks are using their overseas affiliates to write some swaps with non-US counterparties without a parent company guarantee. This means that the transactions would not fall under the purview of US regulators.

Sounds troubling.

But as the infomercials say: Wait! There’s more!

A lot more.

First, the transactions would in fact fall under the purview of regulators in the jurisdictions in which they are done.

Second, on the major systemic risk issues (clearing, trade reporting, margining), there is likely to be little to no substantive difference between major jurisdictions.

So this clearly is not a case of regulatory arbitrage. It’s really about the fact that some customers do not want or have the capacity to understand and comply with regulations in two different jurisdictions. These non-US customers prefer doing business with non-US firms. They don’t want to trade on SEFs. So the US firms are structuring their businesses to meet this demand.

Most people know all of this, as the Journal article acknowledges.

So what’s really the issue? Apparently, it’s the fact there are some differences between jurisdictions in the timing and substance of trade execution rules. So some see the shift to trading overseas as a way for firms to avoid trading on SEFs, which they view as a bad thing, because:

“For US regulators, the new rules aim to bring swaps trading into the open and protect the US financial system from firms amassing huge derivatives positions in non-US markets.”

But that’s not the role of SEFs – that’s what clearing and trade reporting are all about. And as we noted, on these issues there’s not much if any difference between jurisdictions.

One final thought: the article begins with a chart that purports to show concentration in the derivatives markets. The data in question, however, is for the US only and includes only US banks. As we have written, the derivatives markets are truly global, and a look at our report here shows a more accurate picture.

Misperceptions like this… that’s why we’re hangin’ around, with nothing to do but frown….

More or Less?

Is the OTC derivatives market growing…or shrinking?  A recent Bloomberg BusinessWeek piece helps provide an answer.

The article reports on ISDA’s OTC Derivatives Market Analysis, Year-End 2012, which pulls together data from a variety of sources to show the impact of some key trends, like clearing, portfolio compression and netting, on the underlying market.

Over the past five years, OTC derivatives notional amount outstanding (excluding FX transactions) is up 6.7% from year-end 2007 to year-end 2012, according to the BIS.  If you eliminate the double-counting of cleared transactions (which occurs because one bilateral contract becomes two cleared contracts), it’s down 17.5%.

BUT:  if you then add back in the $214.3 trillion of notional that has been eliminated via portfolio compression over the past five years, the OTC derivatives market has increased 23%.

Shorter-term, the picture is a little different.  The total OTC derivatives market (excluding FX) declined 3.3% from year-end 2011 to year-end 2012.  After eliminating the double-counting of cleared transactions, the decrease was 10.9%.  If you take this number and add back in the impact of portfolio compression, the market was roughly flat year-over-year.

Another interesting stat from the Market Analysis has to do with the level of risk exposures in the OTC derivatives market.  At year-end 2012, gross market values (a more appropriate measure of risk than notionals outstanding) were 3.9% of notionals.

Netting significantly reduces those exposures; gross credit exposures after netting were 0.6% of notionals.  Factor in the widespread collateralization of OTC derivatives and the uncollateralized exposure after netting is about 0.2% of the notional outstanding.

We know that going through all of these numbers is a bit of a tough slog.  But it’s important to realize that sometimes there’s more to the story than what appears on the surface.

So the real answer is: more and less.

 

 

Unfriendly Fire

Everyone wants to be liked.  Even banks.  That’s one reason why a recent headline — Bank-Friendly Financial Reform – caught our eye.

It’s courtesy of Taking Note, the editorial page editor’s blog of The New York Times, and it leads a post that focuses on the cross-border application of derivatives regulations.

Truth be told, the piece is not very friendly to banks.  (But you knew that.)  It largely dismisses the legitimate concerns that have been expressed about the scope and timing of the US regulatory framework by numerous policymakers around the world.  The list includes the EC Commissioner for Internal Market and Services, finance ministers in Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russia, South Africa, Switzerland and the UK, and regulators and central bankers in Australia, Hong Kong and Singapore.

Instead, it espouses the curious viewpoint that the administration is not resisting these concerns forcefully enough…and that it might be “saying just enough to shield the administration from charges that it has generally stood by while the banks watered down reform…”

Really?  So that’s what’s been going on?  Washington has been just going through the motions on derivatives reform?

Hardly.

The situation regarding the cross-border application of derivatives rules is important to understand:

• The G20 (which, of course, includes the US) initiated a global process of reform that was intended to create a level playing field among regulators and across jurisdictions.  To achieve this, it’s important for all jurisdictions to remain aligned on the substance and timing of reform.

• European rules are expected to be as stringent and comprehensive as US rules.  Within the US, the SEC is also drafting a strong ruleset.  We expect that ISDA and market participants will continue to find plenty with which to disagree (and hopefully agree) on both counts.

• For one regulator to go it alone risks a number of adverse consequences:  significant legal and operational uncertainty; duplicative or incompatible requirements that create undue costs or are impossible to implement; destabilizing markets by favoring firms/trades in some jurisdictions over others; undermining efforts to develop a long-term, stable regulatory environment that is crucial for strong markets and financial stability.

Much work remains to be done to finalize and implement the new regulatory framework in the US, Europe and other jurisdictions.   International harmonization of these rules is vitally important to achieve the goals of greater financial stability and a more robust financial system – goals that everyone likes.

Sometimes More is Less

Earlier this week, the US CFTC approved rules governing the execution of swap transactions.  Among the major issues was a proposal to require market participants to seek five price quotes on trades done on a swap execution facility.  The Commission ultimately voted to mandate two “request for quotes” (RFQs), with the requirement eventually increasing to three.

The range of headlines (and stories) following the CFTC vote was interesting:

“US in Compromise on Derivatives Trade Rules” (Financial Times)

“Regulators Strike Compromise on New Derivatives Rules” (Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones)

“Big Banks Get Break in Rules to Limit Risks” (New York Times)

“Wall Street Wins Rollback in Dodd-Frank Swap-Trade Rules” (Bloomberg)

“CFTC adopts SEF rule, including RFQ3, voice broking” (Reuters)

Hmmmm.  Was it a compromise, a rollback, a break or something else entirely?  (It clearly was an adoption of a rule, as Reuters notes.)

Another point of interest:  in at least some of the articles, there’s a presumption in favor of requiring five RFQs.

Why?  How or why is it “good” to mandate that a derivatives user request a certain number of price quotes from different dealers?  And why five?

Shouldn’t this be up to market participants to decide?  Particularly since getting a quote is easy enough, given the different ways derivatives users can get or check prices (via phone, terminals, and dealer, broker and other trading systems)?

The flawed assumption is that the client is not qualified to decide for itself whether 2, 3 or 23 quotes are optimal.  It also ignores the fact that information has value for the recipient of the quote requests and the client might not want to offer that information to any more counterparties than is appropriate to the situation.

There’s something else that’s interesting:  it’s the presumption that these trade execution rules have anything to do with reducing risks in the financial system.  Trade execution is about market structure – not systemic risk.  If the goal of financial regulatory reform is to reduce systemic risk, shouldn’t we focus on issues that affect it, like regulatory capital, clearing, margining and regulatory transparency?

Shouldn’t we also avoid mandating “more” to customers when it really means less, and just leave it to them to decide how much is enough?

# # #

ET Phone Home

ET Phone Home…There have been many jokes, quips and witticisms about the unfortunately named extraterritoriality (ET) issues related to OTC derivatives rules in the US.

Some have even been funny.

But not everyone is smiling about ET, as this story by Dow Jones/The Wall Street Journal points out:

“European Union and U.K. regulators urged the U.S. to delay new rules for swaps contracts and reconsider how they apply to foreign banks and transactions.  The complaints add to a chorus of concerns, including from Japanese, French and Swiss regulators, that the U.S. is overstepping its jurisdiction.”

What, exactly, is the beef?

According to a letter from the European Commission that’s quoted in the article, the US rules could “lead to duplication of laws and to potentially irreconcilable conflicts of laws for market operators.”

This is a theme we have sounded before.  It’s also one that policymakers from Asia are voicing.  Earlier this week, five regulators from three Asia-Pacific jurisdictions (Hong Kong, Singapore and Australia) jointly signed a letter to the CFTC voicing their concerns.  As their letter states:

“…we are concerned that some of the proposed requirements as they currently stand may have significant effects on financial markets and institutions outside of the US. We believe a failure to address these concerns could have unintended consequences, including increasing market fragmentation and, potentially, systemic risk in these markets, as well as unduly increasing the compliance burden on industry and regulators.”

Is there a solution in sight?

Perhaps.  As Hong Kong’s Secretary for Finance Services and The Treasury separately wrote to US policymakers:

“…we call for greater coordination internationally on implementation of OTC regulations, particularly those with cross-border implications.  We hope the CFTC, SEC and the US Treasury will defer the application of the US rules and regulations over non-US persons and work with the international community on a coordinated framework on regulatory cooperation in cross-border OTC transactions.  We also hope the US authorities would provide greater clarity to the Proposed Guidance and to recognize the OTC derivatives regulatory regimes of overseas jurisdictions on the basis of international standard.”

The lines are open.  Regulators are standing by.

A Gathering in Boston

A flurry of stories over the past week have reported (including this one in the FT) on an interesting meeting recently held in Boston that was attended by leading buy-side and sell-side market participants. The meeting apparently focused on liquidity and electronic trading in the bond markets.

“But, oddly, participants at last month’s meeting in Boston were not especially gung-ho about electronic trading. Some of the largest asset managers do not believe that transparency is automatically their friend. If they want to shift a big block of bonds, a skilful dealer might be able to do it without moving the market. This is more difficult if you’re sending an order electronically for the world to see.

Unlike equities, debt instruments are not homogenous. There is not always a ready market with buyers and sellers. Banks, as responsible (and often reluctant) market makers will take an asset and hold it for some time.”

Now, as noted, the meeting was about bonds, and not OTC derivatives, and most of it does not concern us. But the parallels between some of the issues faced by both markets are strikingly familiar.

What are those parallels?

The buy-side – asset managers and others – want and need flexibility in executing their transactions. This usually means ensuring they have the right combination of price, speed and anonymity, depending on the particular firm and the particular transaction. The market-making function of banks provides this flexibility. Restrictions that would limit either the ability of firms to receive or the ability of market-makers to provide that flexibility are a real cause for concern for all market participants.

As we have stated, and shown in previous research, the OTC derivatives markets are very price competitive and dealers play an important market-making role in them. Derivatives users have access to prices from a variety of dealers in a variety of ways. Proposed changes to a system that works – and works well – need to do more than preserve the status quo (or why do them in the first place); they need to add incremental value.